Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ARTH 100-301 Portraiture Ivan Drpic R 01:45 PM-04:45 PM The primary goal of the freshman seminar program is to provide every freshman the opportunity for a direct personal encounter with a faculty member in a small sitting devoted to a significant intellectual endeavor. Specific topics be posted at the beginning of each academic year. Please see the College Freshman seminar website for information on current course offerings https://www.college.upenn.edu/node/403. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Freshman Seminar
Objects-Based Learning Course
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ARTH 101-001 World Art and Civilization Before 1400 Sarah M. Guerin MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course serves as a double introduction to the History of Art. First it is a survey of the ancient world that lays the foundation for the History of Art across the whole Eastern Hemisphere. Across this enormous timespan and geographical spread, an emphasis will be placed on moments of interaction, as well as analogies. Secondly, through this overview of the Ancient world up to around 1400, the basic skills that serve the student in the study of the History of Art will also be developed: close looking, understanding plans, the basics of iconography, questions of stylistic development, among others. This course fulfills Sector III: Arts and Letters and counts towards the History of Art major and minor requirements. Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
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ARTH 107-601 Television and New Media William D Schmenner M 05:15 PM-08:15 PM How and when do media become digital? What does digitization afford and what is lost as television and cinema become digitized? As lots of things around us turn digital, have we started telling stories, sharing experiences, and replaying memories differently? What has happened to television and life after New Media ? How have television audiences been transformed by algorithmic cultures of Netflix and Hulu? How have (social) media transformed socialities as ephemeral snaps and swiped intimacies become part of the "new" digital/phone cultures? This is an introductory survey course and we discuss a wide variety of media technologies and phenomena that include: cloud computing, Internet of Things, trolls, distribution platforms, optical fiber cables, surveillance tactics, social media, and race in cyberspace. We also examine emerging mobile phone cultures in the Global South and the environmental impact of digitization. Course activities include Tumblr blog posts and Instagram curations. The final project could take the form of either a critical essay (of 2000 words) or a media project. COML099601, ENGL078601, CIMS103601
ARTH 108-401 World Film Hist To 1945 Chenshu Zhou MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course surveys the history of world film from cinema s precursors to 1945. We will develop methods for analyzing film while examining the growth of film as an art, an industry, a technology, and a political instrument. Topics include the emergence of film technology and early film audiences, the rise of narrative film and birth of Hollywood, national film industries and movements, African-American independent film, the emergence of the genre film (the western, film noir, and romantic comedies), ethnographic and documentary film, animated films, censorship, the MPPDA and Hays Code, and the introduction of sound. We will conclude with the transformation of several film industries into propaganda tools during World War II (including the Nazi, Soviet, and US film industries). In addition to contemporary theories that investigate the development of cinema and visual culture during the first half of the 20th century, we will read key texts that contributed to the emergence of film theory. There are no prerequisites. Students are required to attend screenings or watch films on their own. ENGL091401, COML123401, CIMS101401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 108-402 World Film Hist To 1945 William D Schmenner TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course surveys the history of world film from cinema s precursors to 1945. We will develop methods for analyzing film while examining the growth of film as an art, an industry, a technology, and a political instrument. Topics include the emergence of film technology and early film audiences, the rise of narrative film and birth of Hollywood, national film industries and movements, African-American independent film, the emergence of the genre film (the western, film noir, and romantic comedies), ethnographic and documentary film, animated films, censorship, the MPPDA and Hays Code, and the introduction of sound. We will conclude with the transformation of several film industries into propaganda tools during World War II (including the Nazi, Soviet, and US film industries). In addition to contemporary theories that investigate the development of cinema and visual culture during the first half of the 20th century, we will read key texts that contributed to the emergence of film theory. There are no prerequisites. Students are required to attend screenings or watch films on their own. ENGL091402, COML123402, CIMS101402 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
ARTH 109-401 World Film Hist '45-Pres Meta Mazaj TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film. At the same time, those formal features will be closely linked to historical and cultural distinctions and changes, ranging from the Paramount Decision of 1948 to the digital convergences that are defining screen culture today. There are no perquisites. Requirements will include readings in film history and film analysis, an analytical essay, a research paper, a final exam, and active participation. ENGL092401, COML124401, CIMS102401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
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ARTH 109-402 World Film Hist '45-Pres Filippo Trentin TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film. At the same time, those formal features will be closely linked to historical and cultural distinctions and changes, ranging from the Paramount Decision of 1948 to the digital convergences that are defining screen culture today. There are no perquisites. Requirements will include readings in film history and film analysis, an analytical essay, a research paper, a final exam, and active participation. ENGL092402, COML124402, CIMS102402 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
ARTH 110-001 What Is Modern Art? Andre Dombrowski TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Modern art is not easily defined. Among its manifold practices, we find the rise of abstraction, paintings that pretend to show nothing but an instant, dreams and erotic desires set free for everyone to see, and everyday objects elevated to the status of sculpture. At key moments, "Art" itself was declared dead, then resurrected as the solution to the social problems of the era, forming a highly ambivalent relationship to the spheres of politics and history. Paper was cut and glued, oil paint dripped and thrown, and every thinkable material marshalled into the processes of fabrication, including the artist's body itself. Artistic training became less relevant, and the novelty of idea was elevated over skill. We will cover the development of Modernism broadly, from the 1860s to the 1960s, introducing many of the best-known figures (like Monet, Van Gogh, Duchamp, and Picasso) and movements (like Impressionism, Cubism, Dada, and Surrealism). Europe and North America will be the focus, but we will frequently look to global developments as well and analyze art made in colonial and diasporic conditions. The standard narratives of Modernism will be questioned at every turn, and artists of color, diverse gender and sexual orientations, as well as national and economic backgrounds studied in depth as well. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 180-401 Intro To Queer Art Jonathan D Katz W 03:30 PM-06:30 PM It's no exaggeration to note that queers have long been at the forefront of innovation in the arts, and that the arts, generally, have been a comfortable home for queers, even at moments when society at large was distinctly hostile. In fact the concepts of modern art and homosexuality that we use today are twins, for they were both founded in the third quarter of the 19th century and grew up together. Introduction to Queer Art thus begins with the coining of the word "homosexual" in 1869, and surveys how painting, sculpture, poetry, music, and film shifted in response to that development. Along the way, we will work towards answering two related questions: 1) Why were queers creators largely responsible for the introduction of modernity in the arts, and 2) why do we find so often that queer social and political dissent found form in, and as, aesthetic dissent as well? In creating new forms for art that often seem far removed from any traditional definition of sexuality, queer artists pushed the boundaries of normativity, leading to new ways of seeing, hearing, feeling and thinking that often dared to encode queer meanings as part of their formal innovation. Were queer artists driven by a utopian hope that in a more modern world, the egregious homophobia/transphobia of the past would finally be no more? And finally we will ask about the social and political usefulness of forms of queer political dissent if those forms still remain illegible as queer to a wider audience. Throughout, new methods informed by queer, gender, and critical race theory will be utilized. GSWS180401
ARTH 214-401 Arts of China Nancy R S Steinhardt MWF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A broad survey of Chinese architecture, sculpture, and painting from the Neolithic age through the nineteenth century. Topics include excavated material from China's Bronze Age, Chinese funerary arts, Buddhist caves and sculpture (including works in the University Museum), the Chinese city, the Chinese garden, and major masterpieces of Chinese painting. Prerequisite: Graduate students may take this course as EALC 527 and should see the instructor to discuss additional requirements for graduate credit. EALC127401, EALC527401, ARTH614401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 222-401 Art of Ancient Iran Holly Pittman TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course offers a survey of ancient Iranian art and culture from the painted pottery cultures of the Neolithic era to the monuments of the Persian Empire. Particular emphasis is placed on the Early Bronze Age. ARTH622401, AAMW622401, NELC222401, NELC622401
ARTH 226-601 Hellenistic and Roman Art and Artifact Stephanie Anne Hagan TR 05:15 PM-06:30 PM This course surveys the political, religious and domestic arts, patronage and display in Rome's Mediterranean, from the 2nd c. BCE to Constantine's 4th-c. Christianized empire. Our subjects are images and decorated objects in their cultural, political and socio-economic contexts (painting, mosaic, sculpture, luxury and mass-produced arts in many media). We start with the Hellenistic cosmopolitan culture of the Greek kingdoms and their neighbors, and late Etruscan and Republican Italy; next we map Imperial Roman art as developed around the capital city Rome, as well as in the provinces of the vast empire. CLST221601 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 227-401 Introduction To Mediterranean Archaeology Kimberly Diane Bowes MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM The cultures of Greece and Rome, what we call classical antiquity, span over a thousand years of multicultural achievement in the Mediterranean. This course tells the story of what it was like to live in the complex societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This story is told principally using the art, architecture, pottery and coins produced by these societies. We will examine both the bold and sexy, and the small and humble, from the Parthenon to wooden huts, from the Aphrodite of Knidos to the bones of a fisherman named Peter. CLST111401, ANTH111401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes) Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
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ARTH 229-401 Roman Arch & Urbanism Mantha Zarmakoupi WF 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Architecture is the most striking legacy of Rome and the well-preserved remains of Roman buildings dominate our vision of the empire. Although Roman architecture has been studied since the Renaissance, it is only since the middle of the 20th century that it has come to be appreciated for the developments in concrete construction, which led to a revolution in the treatment of interior space and landscape architecture. Indeed, Rome's architectural revolution radically changed both cities and countryside. Romans developed a wide range of new architectural forms and technological innovations in order to meet the increasingly sophisticated and diverse needs of their society. The purpose of the course is to shed light on Roman architectural and urban projects within their social, political, religious, and physical contexts. Throughout, the emphasis will be on concepts of organizing space, issues of structure, materials, decoration and proportion, the role of architecture in Roman society, and on the varied ways that architecture was employed by individuals and communities to express and enhance their status. CLST229401, ARTH629401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 230-401 The Material World in Archaeological Science Vanessa Workman
Marie-Claude Boileau
Deborah I Olszewski
TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM By focusing on the scientific analysis of inorganic archaeological materials, this course will explore processes of creation in the past. ANTH 221 will take place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will be team taught in three modules: analysis of lithics, analysis of ceramics and analysis of metals. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how the transformation of materials into objects provides key information about past human behaviors and the socio-economic contexts of production, distribution, exchange and use. Discussion topics will include invention and adoption of new technologies, change and innovation, use of fire, and craft specialization. NELC584401, NELC284401, CLST244401, ANTH221401, ANTH521401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
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ARTH 250-401 Michelangelo and the Art of the Italian Renaissance David Young Kim MW 05:15 PM-06:45 PM An introduction to the work of the Renaissance artist Michelangelo (1475-1564)-his sculptures, paintings, architecture, poetry, and artistic theory-in relation to his patrons, predecessors, and contemporaries, above all Leonardo and Raphael. Topics include artistic creativity and license, religious devotion, the revival of antiquity, observation of nature, art as problem-solving, the public reception and function of artworks, debates about style, artistic rivalry, and traveling artists. Rather than taking the form of a survey, this course selects works as paradigmatic case studies, and will analyze contemporary attitudes toward art of this period through study of primary sources. ITAL250401, ITAL650401, ARTH650401
ARTH 268-401 Art and Empire in India, 1750-1900 Sonal Khullar TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course surveys transformations in visual culture between the Mughal and British empires in India from the mid-eighteenth through the nineteenth centuries. We shall consider changes in artistic production, patronage, publics, and viewing protocols in the contexts of the court and bazaar. We shall examine the emergence of new technologies and its impact on visual forms, media, and genres, focusing on the interplay of photography, print, and painting. We shall explore the role of institutions -the art school, the museum, and the archeological survey- and the professions and practices they engendered. We shall analyze how architecture and urban planning created new built environments and social relationships in colonial India. We shall view objects first-hand in the Penn Museum, Penn Libraries, and Philadelphia Museum of Art. This is a reading- and writing-intensive course. Students with a background in related disciplines such as literature, history, religion, anthropology, and South Asian Studies are welcome. ARTH668401, SAST268401, SAST668401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 274-601 Facing America William D Schmenner W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examining the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino, and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, including museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s. LALS274601, ARTH674601, AFRC294601, CIMS293601, ASAM294601 Course Online: Synchronous Format
ARTH 278-401 American Art Michael Leja MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course surveys the most important and interesting art produced in the United States (or by American artists living abroad) up through the 1950s. This period encompasses the history of both early and modern art in the U.S., from its first appearances to its rise to prominence and institutionalization. While tracking this history, the course examines art's relation to historical processes of modernization (industrialization, the development of transportation and communications, the spread of corporate organization in business, urbanization, technological development, the rise of mass media and mass markets, etc.) and to the economic polarization, social fragmentation, political conflict, and the cultural changes these developments entailed. In these circumstances, art is drawn simultaneously toward truth and fraud, realism and artifice, science and spirituality, commodification and ephemerality, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, individualism and collectivity, the past and the future, professionalization and popularity, celebrating modern life and criticizing it. ARTH678401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 281-401 Modern Arch:1900-Present David B Brownlee MWF 10:15 AM-11:15 AM The architecture of Europe and America from the late nineteenth century until the present is the central subject of this course, but some time is also devoted to Latin American and Asian architecture and to the important issues of modern city planning. Topics discussed include the Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau, Expressionism, Art Deco, the International Style, and Post-modernism. The debate over the role of technology in modern life and art, the search for a universal language of architectural communication, and the insistent demand that architecture serve human society are themes that are traced throughout the course. Among the important figures to be considered are Frank Lloyd Wright, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, Robert Venturi, and Denise Scott Brown. The course includes weekly discussion sessions and several excursions to view architecture in Philadelphia. ARTH681401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 287-401 Postwar Art Jonathan D Katz TR 05:15 PM-06:15 PM At a time of seismic shifts in the American polity, postwar art has too often seemed above the fray. Even as New York came to replace Paris as the epicenter of art world in the post war period, the rapid succession of styles and movements from Abstract Expressionism to Neo-Dada, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art and Happenings can seem to have their own internal logic, severed from the historical backdrop of the time. Some of the artists we'll consider include Pollock, Krasner, Rauschenberg, Johns, Warhol, Kusama, Martin, Lichtenstein, Bearden, Oldenburg, LeWitt, Chicago and Judd. In this course, we'll reexamine American art and art criticism in the postwar period alive to everything from the Cold War's virulent anti-communism to the rise of progressive liberation movements around race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender. In the process, we will repeatedly underscore how art both served, and bit, the hand that fed it. ARTH687401, GSWS287401, GSWS687401
ARTH 305-401 Rx/Museum: Barnes Curatorial Seminar Aaron Levy M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2021 semester, the topic will be: Rx/Museum: Barnes Foundation Curatorial Seminar. This Spiegel-Wilks Curatorial Seminar is offered in collaboration with the Barnes Foundation. Students will be provided with an immersion in curatorial and museum studies and will have the opportunity to interact with curators, scholars, and staff at Penn and the museum, including Executive Director and President Thom Collins, who will co-teach the course. The course will meet weekly at the Barnes Foundation in a classroom inside the permanent collection. The syllabus will explore topics such as the history of the collection, Barnes' perspectives on art and education, and the cultural politics of art and institutions today. As part of the course, students will also conduct research and contribute to a digital platform, Rx/Museum, a partnership between Penn Medicine, the Barnes Foundation, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Slought Foundation. Through a weekly 'dose' of art, the project brings the museum experience to the hospital and seeks to foster a humanistic approach to health and healing through visual art and reflective pedagogy. ENGL205401
ARTH 382-401 Film Exhibition and Moviegoing Chenshu Zhou T 12:00 PM-03:00 PM Cinema has always had an audience. From its first appearances in cafes, tea houses, and variety shows to today's fragmented, digital consumption, cinema continues to exist in relation to different ways of looking and experiencing. This course examines how films have been shown and how audiences have watched films in diverse historical and cultural contexts. We will explore how the ways in which film screenings were organized shape both the films being shown and audiences' moviegoing experiences. Based on historical and site-specific investigations, we will also reflect on how our modes of engaging with cinema impact conceptions of what cinema is, what it will be, and what it can be. Unlike most film courses, this course does not focus on analyzing films, but look into the operations of cinema as an institution. There will be field trips to local movie theaters and a final collective project that asks students to curate a special film screening (in-person or online) using innovative formats. CIMS381401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 386-301 Modern Design Heather Gibson Moqtaderi W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2021 semester, the topic will be: Modern Design. This course examines modern design from the turn of the 20th century through the present, including furniture, metalwork, ceramics, glass, plastics, lighting, electronics, and design environments. Our study focuses on design objects in museum collections as well as period journals and criticism. Topics include influential designers and movements of Europe and North America as well as counterparts in Asia, Africa, and South America. We will use design exhibitions at galleries and museums as resource for discussion and writing throughout the term. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 387-401 The History of American Animation Linda R. Simensky M 05:15 PM-08:15 PM This topic course explores multiple and different aspects of Animation. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings. FNAR320401, ENGL302401, CIMS320401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 389-403 Topics Film Studies: Cinema and Politics Rita Barnard TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This topic course explores aspects of Cinema Studies intensively. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings. ENGL392403, CIMS392403, COML391403 Benjamin Franklin Seminars
ARTH 391-401 Topics Film History: Global Documentary Julia Alekseyeva M 12:00 PM-03:00 PM Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings. ENGL291401, CIMS201401, COML201401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 505-640 Women Artists: Protagonists of the Italian Renaissance, 1450-1700 Sheila Barker R 05:15 PM-07:55 PM This MLA course in the history of art explores an aspect of Art History and Theory, specific course topics vary. Please see the College of Liberal and Professional Studies Course Guide for a description of current offerings. Undergraduates Need Permission
ARTH 511-401 Arts of the Book in South Asia Sonal Khullar R 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2021 semester, the topic will be: Arts of the Book in South Asia. This course critically surveys the history of books in South Asia from 1100 to the present, focusing on the relationship between the visual arts and book form. Beginning with palm-leaf manuscripts in the pothi format and their repositories, we consider material and cultural shifts in the idea, use, and practice of the book with the widespread use of paper and production of codices in Sultanate, Mughal, Deccani, and Rajput courts painting from the fifteenth century onward. Then we analyze transformations of the book in colonial South Asia with the rise of photography and print technologies, and a changing public for art, printed books, and illustrated manuscripts. We conclude by examining the revival and resurgence of books, including artists' books and artistic projects about book culture, in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Throughout we attend to physical and social contexts for the book, including workshops, libraries, storehouses, schools, and museums. We explore multiple modalities that bear upon book use, that is, orality, aurality, textuality, performativity, and visuality, and various practices that books generate, that is, making, collecting, gifting, junking, cutting, pasting, binding, inscribing, translating, publishing, curating, venerating, and recycling. We shall view objects first-hand in the Penn Libraries and Philadelphia Museum of Art. This is a reading- and writing-intensive course. Students with a background in related disciplines such as literature, history, religion, architecture, anthropology, geography, cinema studies, and feminist studies are welcome. SAST505401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 524-401 Mesopotamia 2200-1600 Bce Stephen J. Tinney
Holly Pittman
T 03:30 PM-06:30 PM This seminar style class will focus on two canonical periods of Mesopotamian history from 2100-1600 BCE. It is structured to examine fundamental institutions of kingship, religion, economy, law and literature. Practices well established in Sumer by the end of the third millennium evolved during the first half of the second millennium BCE when Amorite speaking peoples assume central roles in Mesopotamian institutions. The class will be structured around case studies engaging key monuments of art, architecture and literature. It will be team-taught by Prof. Pittman, focusing on material remains and visual arts and by Prof. Steve Tinney who brings expertise to the rich cuneiform textual traditions. AAMW521401, NELC502401, ANTH524401
ARTH 529-401 Eco-Critical Approaches To Roman Ideas of Landscape Mantha Zarmakoupi R 10:15 AM-01:15 PM Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2021 semester, the topic will be: Eco-critical Approaches to Roman Ideas of Landscape. In the Roman period, landscape was singled out as a theme for the first time in Greco-Roman visual culture. Writers described it accurately in texts and treatises, its qualities were praised and sought out in everyday life, and images of the natural world permeated the public and private spheres. This attention to landscape found an architectural expression in Roman luxury villas. It is primarily in the luxurious country-house residences that ideas about landscape were fully explored and shaped. In designing for luxury, Romans engaged in a sophisticated interplay of architecture and landscape - an interplay that Renaissance architects discovered and reinvented, and which persists to this day. This course will analyze the architectural design and wall-painting decoration of Roman villas, the cultivated landscapes around them, and their literary representations in order to address the ways in which ideas about and the idealization of landscape contributed to the creation of a novel language of architecture and landscape architecture. And while Roman luxury villa architecture and decoration showcase sophisticated ideas about landscape, they silenced and beautified the dependence of their surrounding cultivated landscapes and agricultural estates on enslaved labor. Moving beyond post-Renaissance ideas of landscape and canonical considerations of Roman wall-painting, the course will adopt an eco-critical lens to shed light on the ideas and idealization of landscape that were shaped in this period. It will draw on a diverse body of evidence (archaeological, art historical, and literary) in order to prioritize perceptions of ecology, environment and human-nature relationships and uncover a broader relationship between architecture, landscape architecture and design. AAMW529401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 571-401 Modern Arch Theory Zhongjie Lin
David B Brownlee
R 01:45 PM-04:45 PM A survey of architectural theory from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. The discussion of original writings will be emphasized. CPLN572401 Undergraduates Need Permission https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 584-401 Topics in Cultural Hist: Making & Marking Time Liliane Weissberg T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Topic for Fall 2021: Making and Marking Time. What is time? In the late 19th century, the questions of how to define time, how to slow down time, and, above all, how to accelerate movement have become a focus of the work by many European philosophers who have tried to come to terms with what is now termed as the Industrial Revolution, and the idea of "progress." And can time be understood as something continuous, or is it fragmented, proceeding in fits and burst? Such contemplations on time have deeply influenced writers and visual artists alike. Marcel Proust was a reader of Henri Bergson and translated his theories of time into a concept of memory. Impressionist painters insisted on picturing fleeting moments, and composers experimented with temporal sequences. Thomas Mann has tried to navigate timelessness in a novel set on a "Magic Mountain." Virginia Woolf and James Joyce have pictured an entire universe in a single day (Mrs. Dalloway, Ulysses). Early 20th century Italian Futurists made the contemplation of time part of their manifestoes, and expressionist writers and artists, as well as the supporters of the DADA movement in Germany or elsewhere in Europe were theorizing about time as well. This would influence their choice of genre and form, their writerly practice and technique. Pictures were set into motion in scholarly studies by photographer Eadweard Muybridge and finally in the new medium film. We may be able to understand a reconsideration of time as driving force for the modern movement, or simply "modernity." In this seminar, we will study a selection of literary texts of the late 19th century and the modernist movement, consider the philosophical background and changes in historiography, and consider the development in the visual arts at this time, in particular painting and the new media of photography and film. COML537401, ENGL563401, GRMN541401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 597-301 Future of Arts Audiences Arthur Cohen R 10:15 AM-01:15 PM Demographic, political, social and generational changes in the U.S. have given rise to new and often unprecedented changes in the expectations audiences have for the role cultural organizations should play in society. Extending beyond traditional definitions of purpose rooted in the type of art or experience offered, cultural organizations are increasingly being held accountable to new or different standards of behavior, beliefs and engagement with the world in order to gain the support of the very audiences necessary for their survival. Adding to this complex combination of factors are the ongoing effects of recent health and social justice crises, including changes in technological usage and shifting patterns of social interaction. Using the latest audience research, and highlighted with first-person accounts from cultural leaders who will be guest speakers for this course, The Future of Arts Audiences will pose a series of challenging yet essential questions necessary for navigating the road ahead for arts participation. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 614-401 Arts of China Nancy R S Steinhardt MWF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The goals of this course are to introduce the major artistic traditions of China, from the Neolithic period to the present and to teach the fundamental methods of the discipline of art history. Our approaches will be chronological, considering how the arts developed in and through history, and thematic, discussing how art and architecture were used for philosophical, religious and material ends. Topics of study will include: Shang bronzes: Han concepts of the afterlife; the impact of Buddhism; patronage and painting; the landscape tradition; the concept of the literatus; architecture and garden design; the "modern" and 20th-century artistic practices; among others. EALC127401, EALC527401, ARTH214401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 622-401 Art of Ancient Iran Holly Pittman TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course offers a survey of ancient Iranian art and culture from the painted pottery cultures of the Neolithic era to the monuments of the Persian Empire. Particular emphasis is placed on the Early Bronze Age. ARTH222401, AAMW622401, NELC222401, NELC622401
ARTH 629-401 Roman Arch & Urbanism Mantha Zarmakoupi WF 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Architecture is the most striking legacy of Rome and the well-preserved remains of Roman buildings dominate our vision of the empire. Although Roman architecture has been studied since the Renaissance, it is only since the middle of the 20th century that it has come to be appreciated for the developments in concrete construction, which led to a revolution in the treatment of interior space and landscape architecture. Indeed, Rome's architectural revolution radically changed both cities and countryside. Romans developed a wide range of new architectural forms and technological innovations in order to meet the increasingly sophisticated and diverse needs of their society. The purpose of the course is to shed light on Roman architectural and urban projects within their social, political, religious, and physical contexts. Throughout, the emphasis will be on concepts of organizing space, issues of structure, materials, decoration and proportion, the role of architecture in Roman society, and on the varied ways that architecture was employed by individuals and communities to express and enhance their status. CLST229401, ARTH229401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 650-401 Michelangelo and the Art of the Italian Renaissance David Young Kim MW 05:15 PM-06:45 PM An introduction to the work of the Renaissance artist Michelangelo (1475-1564)-his sculptures, paintings, architecture, poetry, and artistic theory-in relation to his patrons, predecessors, and contemporaries, above all Leonardo and Raphael. Topics include artistic creativity and license, religious devotion, the revival of antiquity, observation of nature, art as problem-solving, the public reception and function of artworks, debates about style, artistic rivalry, and traveling artists. Rather than taking the form of a survey, this course selects works as paradigmatic case studies, and will analyze contemporary attitudes toward art of this period through study of primary sources. ITAL250401, ITAL650401, ARTH250401
ARTH 668-401 Art and Empire in India, 1750-1900 Sonal Khullar TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course surveys transformations in visual culture between the Mughal and British empires in India from the mid-eighteenth through the nineteenth centuries. We shall consider changes in artistic production, patronage, publics, and viewing protocols in the contexts of the court and bazaar. We shall examine the emergence of new technologies and its impact on visual forms, media, and genres, focusing on the interplay of photography, print, and painting. We shall explore the role of institutions -the art school, the museum, and the archeological survey- and the professions and practices they engendered. We shall analyze how architecture and urban planning created new built environments and social relationships in colonial India. We shall view objects first-hand in the Penn Museum, Penn Libraries, and Philadelphia Museum of Art. This is a reading- and writing-intensive course. Students with a background in related disciplines such as literature, history, religion, anthropology, and South Asian Studies are welcome. ARTH268401, SAST268401, SAST668401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 674-601 Facing America William D Schmenner W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examining the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino, and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, including museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s. LALS274601, AFRC294601, ARTH274601, CIMS293601, ASAM294601 Undergraduates Need Permission
ARTH 678-401 American Art Michael Leja MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course surveys the most important and interesting art produced in the United States (or by American artists living abroad) up through the 1950s. This period encompasses the history of both early and modern art in the U.S., from its first appearances to its rise to prominence and institutionalization. While tracking this history, the course examines art's relation to historical processes of modernization (industrialization, the development of transportation and communications, the spread of corporate organization in business, urbanization, technological development, the rise of mass media and mass markets, etc.) and to the economic polarization, social fragmentation, political conflict, and the cultural changes these developments entailed. In these circumstances, art is drawn simultaneously toward truth and fraud, realism and artifice, science and spirituality, commodification and ephemerality, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, individualism and collectivity, the past and the future, professionalization and popularity, celebrating modern life and criticizing it. ARTH278401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 681-401 Modern Arch:1900-Present David B Brownlee MWF 10:15 AM-11:15 AM The architecture of Europe and America from the late nineteenth century until the present is the central subject of this course, but some time is also devoted to Latin American and Asian architecture and to the important issues of modern city planning. Topics discussed include the Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau, Expressionism, Art Deco, the International Style, and Post-modernism. The debate over the role of technology in modern life and art, the search for a universal language of architectural communication, and the insistent demand that architecture serve human society are themes that are traced throughout the course. Among the important figures to be considered are Frank Lloyd Wright, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, Robert Venturi, and Denise Scott Brown. The course includes weekly discussion sessions and several excursions to view architecture in Philadelphia. ARTH281401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 687-401 Postwar Art Jonathan D Katz TR 05:15 PM-06:15 PM At a time of seismic shifts in the American polity, postwar art has too often seemed above the fray. Even as New York came to replace Paris as the epicenter of art world in the post war period, the rapid succession of styles and movements from Abstract Expressionism to Neo-Dada, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art and Happenings can seem to have their own internal logic, severed from the historical backdrop of the time. Some of the artists we'll consider include Pollock, Krasner, Rauschenberg, Johns, Warhol, Kusama, Martin, Lichtenstein, Bearden, Oldenburg, LeWitt, Chicago and Judd. In this course, we'll reexamine American art and art criticism in the postwar period alive to everything from the Cold War's virulent anti-communism to the rise of progressive liberation movements around race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender. In the process, we will repeatedly underscore how art both served, and bit, the hand that fed it. ARTH287401, GSWS287401, GSWS687401
ARTH 729-401 Top in Rom Arch/Topograp Charles Brian Rose T 10:15 AM-01:15 PM Topic varies. Spring 2018: This seminar offers a critical assessment of digital Roman architecture studies. What has been accomplished and learned over the last generation since the Digital Turn, and where is the field of Roman architecture being taken? Points of focus include several landmark case studies, such as digital reconstructions of the city of ancient Rome, and threatened cultural heritage sites in Syria. The course will involve readings of significant texts, in class discussions and presentations lead by the seminar s participants, and testing and critiquing of a limited set of digital tools. CLST728401
ARTH 740-401 Medieval Art Now Ivan Drpic
Sarah M. Guerin
W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Topics vary from semester to semester. For the Fall 2021 semester, the topic will be: Medieval Art Now. How has the field of medieval art history, here understood in the ecumenical sense to include the Byzantine and Islamicate worlds, changed since the 1990s and the methodological reorientations brought about by the so-called "new art history"? Indeed, what is happening in medieval art now? This graduate seminar will introduce students to the key developments and theoretical interventions that have shaped the field over the past twenty years. Topics will include: vision and visuality; materiality; thing theory; phenomenology; art's intersection with science; ecocriticism; the global turn; critical race theory; and the rise of the digital humanities. By critically engaging with some of the most invigorating recent scholarship, we will reflect on the state of medieval art history and consider what its future might or should look like. AAMW740401, RELS702401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 775-301 The Paris Commune: A Revolution Recorded Andre Dombrowski W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Topic varies from semester to semester. For Fall 2021, the topic will be: The Paris Commune - A Revolution Recorded. The year 2021 marks the 150th anniversary of the Paris Commune, the revolutionary, radically socialist government that ruled the city of Paris briefly, from March to May 1871. Not the first, but in fact the last of the French revolutions of the 18th and 19th centuries, the Commune is arguably the best recorded, most mediated, and most modern one among them. Photography became a tool in revolutionary action, and a mass press reported and illustrated events, receiving global attention. A new tourist economy traded on access and proximity to revolutionary spectacle and trafficked in political souvenirs. An avant-garde art scene developed that responded to the upheaval in novel ways, including artists and writers like Courbet, Manet, Rimbaud, among others. The Communards themselves often saw their political actions as performance and conceived of their acts in aesthetic terms - a fact that continued, for those that survived, into their exile in New Caledonia after the revolution ended abruptly in the aptly-named Bloody Week. The Paris Commune, this is to say, was one of the more performative and artistic revolutions in history and is therefore worth analyzing art historically. Along the way, this seminar will engage the broader question as to how we best study the import of discrete political events through the lens of art history more generally.