Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ARTH 100-301 The Printed Image Shira N. Brisman T 03:00 PM-06:00 PM The primary goal of the freshman seminar program is to provide every freshman the opportunity for a direct personal encounter with a faculty member in a small sitting devoted to a significant intellectual endeavor. Specific topics be posted at the beginning of each academic year. Please see the College Freshman seminar website for information on current course offerings https://www.college.upenn.edu/node/403. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Freshman Seminar</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Objects-Based Learning Course</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 101-001 World Art and Civilization Before 1400 Sarah M. Guerin MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course serves as a double introduction to the History of Art. First it is a survey of the ancient world that lays the foundation for the History of Art across the whole Eastern Hemisphere. Across this enormous timespan and geographical spread, an emphasis will be placed on moments of interaction, as well as analogies. Secondly, through this overview of the Ancient world up to around 1400, the basic skills that serve the student in the study of the History of Art will also be developed: close looking, understanding plans, the basics of iconography, questions of stylistic development, among others. This course fulfills Sector III: Arts and Letters and counts towards the History of Art major and minor requirements. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 106-001 Architect and History Mantha Zarmakoupi MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Humanities & Social Science Sector</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span>
ARTH 107-401 Television and New Media Rahul Mukherjee W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM How and when do media become digital? What does digitization afford and what is lost as television and cinema become digitized? As lots of things around us turn digital, have we started telling stories, sharing experiences, and replaying memories differently? What has happened to television and life after New Media ? How have television audiences been transformed by algorithmic cultures of Netflix and Hulu? How have (social) media transformed socialities as ephemeral snaps and swiped intimacies become part of the "new" digital/phone cultures? This is an introductory survey course and we discuss a wide variety of media technologies and phenomena that include: cloud computing, Internet of Things, trolls, distribution platforms, optical fiber cables, surveillance tactics, social media, and race in cyberspace. We also examine emerging mobile phone cultures in the Global South and the environmental impact of digitization. Course activities include Tumblr blog posts and Instagram curations. The final project could take the form of either a critical essay (of 2000 words) or a media project. CIMS103401, ENGL078401, COML099401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 107-601 Television and New Media Jeremy Felix Gallion M 05:00 PM-08:00 PM How and when do media become digital? What does digitization afford and what is lost as television and cinema become digitized? As lots of things around us turn digital, have we started telling stories, sharing experiences, and replaying memories differently? What has happened to television and life after New Media ? How have television audiences been transformed by algorithmic cultures of Netflix and Hulu? How have (social) media transformed socialities as ephemeral snaps and swiped intimacies become part of the "new" digital/phone cultures? This is an introductory survey course and we discuss a wide variety of media technologies and phenomena that include: cloud computing, Internet of Things, trolls, distribution platforms, optical fiber cables, surveillance tactics, social media, and race in cyberspace. We also examine emerging mobile phone cultures in the Global South and the environmental impact of digitization. Course activities include Tumblr blog posts and Instagram curations. The final project could take the form of either a critical essay (of 2000 words) or a media project. CIMS103601, ENGL078601, COML099601 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 108-401 World Film Hist To 1945 William D Schmenner MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM This course surveys the history of world film from cinema's precursors to 1945. We will develop methods for analyzing film while examining the growth of film as an art, an industry, a technology, and a political instrument. Topics include the emergence of film technology and early film audiences, the rise of narrative film and birth of Hollywood, national film industries and movements, African-American independent film, the emergence of the genre film (the western, film noir, and romantic comedies), ethnographic and documentary film, animated films, censorship, the MPPDA and Hays Code, and the introduction of sound. We will conclude with the transformation of several film industries into propaganda tools during World War II (including the Nazi, Soviet, and US film industries). In addition to contemporary theories that investigate the development of cinema and visual culture during the first half of the 20th century, we will read key texts that contributed to the emergence of film theory. There are no prerequisites. Students are required to attend screenings or watch films on their own. CIMS101401, COML123401, ENGL091401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 108-402 World Film Hist To 1945 Joseph Michael Coppola MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course surveys the history of world film from cinema's precursors to 1945. We will develop methods for analyzing film while examining the growth of film as an art, an industry, a technology, and a political instrument. Topics include the emergence of film technology and early film audiences, the rise of narrative film and birth of Hollywood, national film industries and movements, African-American independent film, the emergence of the genre film (the western, film noir, and romantic comedies), ethnographic and documentary film, animated films, censorship, the MPPDA and Hays Code, and the introduction of sound. We will conclude with the transformation of several film industries into propaganda tools during World War II (including the Nazi, Soviet, and US film industries). In addition to contemporary theories that investigate the development of cinema and visual culture during the first half of the 20th century, we will read key texts that contributed to the emergence of film theory. There are no prerequisites. Students are required to attend screenings or watch films on their own. CIMS101402, COML123402, ENGL091402 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 109-401 World Film Hist '45-Pres Meta Mazaj TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film. At the same time, those formal features will be closely linked to historical and cultural distinctions and changes, ranging from the Paramount Decision of 1948 to the digital convergences that are defining screen culture today. There are no perquisites. Requirements will include readings in film history and film analysis, an analytical essay, a research paper, a final exam, and active participation. Fulfills the Arts and Letters Sector (All Classes). CIMS102401, ENGL092401, COML124401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 109-402 World Film Hist '45-Pres Anat Dan TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film. At the same time, those formal features will be closely linked to historical and cultural distinctions and changes, ranging from the Paramount Decision of 1948 to the digital convergences that are defining screen culture today. There are no perquisites. Requirements will include readings in film history and film analysis, an analytical essay, a research paper, a final exam, and active participation. Fulfills the Arts and Letters Sector (All Classes). CIMS102402, COML124402, ENGL092402 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 141-401 Monuments, Museums, & Heritage in the Times of Covid and Black Lives Matter Richard M Leventhal TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course will focus upon and examine the ethics of international heritage and the role that Museums play in the preservation of identity and cultural heritage. The mission of this course will be to inform and educate students about the role of Museums within the 21st century. What is the role and position of antiquities and important cultural objects in Museums? How should Museums acquire these objects and when should they be returned to countries and cultural groups? Examples from current issues will be included in the reading and discussions along with objects and issues within the Penn Museum. ANTH141401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 224-401 Art of Mesopotamia Holly Pittman TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The class presents a survey of the art and archaeology of Mesopotamia beginning with the appearance of the first cities and ending with the fall of the Assyrian Empire in the seventh century BCE. It presents the major artistic monuments of Mesopotamian culture, embedding them in their historical context. Focus is placed in particular on the interactions with surrounding cultures of Iran, Central Asia, the Caucasus, the Persian Gulf and Anatolia in order to decenter the discourse from a strictly Mesopotamian perspective. The format is lecture; assignments involve reading response papers; there are in class midterm and final exams. AAMW624401, ARTH624401, NELC224401, NELC624401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 227-401 Introduction To Mediterranean Archaeology Kimberly Diane Bowes MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM The cultures of Greece and Rome, what we call classical antiquity, span over a thousand years of multicultural achievement in the Mediterranean. This course tells the story of what it was like to live in the complex societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This story is told principally using the art, architecture, pottery and coins produced by these societies. We will examine both the bold and sexy, and the small and humble, from the Parthenon to wooden huts, from the Aphrodite of Knidos to the bones of a fisherman named Peter. ANTH111401, CLST111401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 230-401 The Material World in Archaeological Science Marie-Claude Boileau
Jan Moritz Jansen
Deborah I Olszewski
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of inorganic archaeological materials, this course will explore processes of creation in the past. ANTH 221 will take place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will be team taught in three modules: analysis of lithics, analysis of ceramics and analysis of metals. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how the transformation of materials into objects provides key information about past human behaviors and the socio-economic contexts of production, distribution, exchange and use. Discussion topics will include invention and adoption of new technologies, change and innovation, use of fire, and craft specialization. ANTH521401, ANTH221401, CLST244401, NELC284401, NELC584401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 237-401 Berlin: Hist Pol Culture Liliane Weissberg TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM What do you know about Berlin's history, architecture, culture, and political life? The present course will offer a survey of the history of Prussia, beginning with the seventeenth century, and the unification of the small towns of Berlin and Koelln to establish a new capital for this country. It will tell the story of Berlin's rising political prominence in the eighteenth century, and its position as a center of the German and Jewish Enlightenment. It will follow Berlin's transformation into an industrial city in the nineteenth century, its rise to metropolis in the early twentieth century, its history during the Third Reich, and the post-war cold war period. The course will conclude its historical survey with a consideration of Berlin's position as a capital in reunified Germany. The historical survey will be supplemented by a study of Berlin's urban structure, its significant architecture from the eighteenth century (i.e. Schinkel) to the nineteenth (new worker's housing, garden suburbs) and twentieth centuries (Bauhaus, Speer designs, postwar rebuilding, GDR housing projects, post-unification building boom). In addition, we will read literary texts about the city, and consider the visual art and music created in and about Berlin, and focus on Berlin's Jewish history. The course will be interdisciplinary with the fields of German Studies, history, history of art, urban studies, and German-Jewish studies. It is also designed as a preparation for undergraduate students who are considering spending a junior semester with the Penn Abroad Program in Berlin. All readings and lectures in English. HIST237401, GRMN237401, COML237401, URBS237401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Humanities & Social Science Sector</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 250-401 Michelangelo and the Art of the Italian Renaissance David Young Kim MWF 10:00 AM-11:00 AM An introduction to the work of the Renaissance artist Michelangelo (1475-1564)-his sculptures, paintings, architecture, poetry, and artistic theory-in relation to his patrons, predecessors, and contemporaries, above all Leonardo and Raphael. Topics include artistic creativity and license, religious devotion, the revival of antiquity, observation of nature, art as problem-solving, the public reception and function of artworks, debates about style, artistic rivalry, and traveling artists. Rather than taking the form of a survey, this course selects works as paradigmatic case studies, and will analyze contemporary attitudes toward art of this period through study of primary sources. ARTH650401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 265-601 Northern Baroque Art CANCELED Northern Baroque art comprises seventeenth-century paintings and prints from Flanders and Holland. Featured artists include: Pieter Bruegel, Hendrick Goltzius, Peter Paul Rubens, Anthony van Dyck, Frans Hals, Rembrandt, and Vermeer. Topics considered include innovations of various kinds--starting with portraits and society, landscapes, still-life, and scenes of daily life (genre pictures).
ARTH 273-401 History of Photography Gregory M. Vershbow TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM A history of photography and theories of photography from 1839 to the present. Photography's origins are rooted both in artistic desire and technological ingenuity. Some of photography's inventors identified more as artists than engineers. At many points in the history of the medium, the question remains open whether new forms of artistic expression are driven by new technologies, or whether new technologies emerge to fulfill the desires of artistic imagination. This class will address photography's relationship with painting, print, and drawing. It will examine the effect of photography on portraiture, landscape, depictions of motion, and abstraction. We will also investigate the changing cultural perception of photography as an artistic medium from the 19th to the 21st century. ARTH673401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span>
ARTH 274-601 Facing America William D Schmenner W 05:30 PM-08:30 PM This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examining the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino, and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, including museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s. ASAM294601, AFRC294601, ARTH674601, LALS274601, CIMS293601 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 278-401 American Art Michael Leja TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course surveys the most important and interesting art produced in the United States (or by American artists living abroad) up through the 1950s. This period encompasses the history of both early and modern art in the U.S., from its first appearances to its rise to prominence and institutionalization. While tracking this history, the course examines art's relation to historical processes of modernization (industrialization, the development of transportation and communications, the spread of corporate organization in business, urbanization, technological development, the rise of mass media and mass markets, etc.) and to the economic polarization, social fragmentation, political conflict, and the cultural changes these developments entailed. In these circumstances, art is drawn simultaneously toward truth and fraud, realism and artifice, science and spirituality, commodification and ephemerality, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, individualism and collectivity, the past and the future, professionalization and popularity, celebrating modern life and criticizing it. ARTH678401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 281-401 Modern Arch:1900-Present David B Brownlee MWF 11:00 AM-12:00 PM The architecture of Europe and America from the late nineteenth century until the present is the central subject of this course, but some time is also devoted to Latin American and Asian architecture and to the important issues of modern city planning. Topics discussed include the Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau, Expressionism, Art Deco, the International Style, and Post-modernism. The debate over the role of technology in modern life and art, the search for a universal language of architectural communication, and the insistent demand that architecture serve human society are themes that are traced throughout the course. Among the important figures to be considered are Frank Lloyd Wright, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, Robert Venturi, and Denise Scott Brown. The course includes weekly discussion sessions and several excursions to view architecture in Philadelphia. ARTH681401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 286-601 Mdrn Art:Picasso-Pollock Lindsay V Grant M 05:30 PM-08:30 PM Early twentieth-century art in Europe is marked by a number of exciting transformations. This period witnessed the rise of abstraction in painting and sculpture, as well as the inventions of collage, photomontage, constructed sculpture, the ready made and found object, and performance art. Encounters with the arts of Africa, Oceania and other traditions unfamiliar in the West spurred innovations in media, technique, and subject matter. Artists began to respond to the challenge of photography, to organize themselves into movements, and in some cases, to challenge the norms of art through "anti-art." A new gallery system replaced traditional forms of exhibiting and selling art, and artists took on new roles as publicists, manifesto writers, and exhibition organizers. This course examines these developments, with attention to formal innovations as well as cultural and political contexts. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span>
ARTH 293-402 Topics Cultural Studies Rahul Mukherjee M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This topic course explores aspects of Film Cultural Studies intensively. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings. ENGL295402, CIMS295402 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 299-401 Radical Arts in the Americas Jennifer Lyn Sternad Ponce De Leon MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM This course examines intersections of artistic production and radical politics in the 20th and 21st centuries. It addresses art from across a wide array of media: street art, film, theater, poetry, performance art, fiction, graphic arts, digital media, and urban interventions. We will examine artistic movements and artists from across the Americas, including revolutionary Latin American theater, film, and literature; the art of Black Liberation in the U.S.; the Chicano art movement and its queer dissidents; street performance and protest produced in the context of dictatorship; anticolonial performance art and alternative reality gaming; and activist art, political theater, and cinema from the 21st century. Through its focus on the relationship between art and politics, this course also introduces students to foundational concepts related to the relationship between culture and power more broadly. ENGL073401, LALS073401, COML073401, THAR073401, CIMS073401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 305-401 Elijah Pierce's America: Barnes Foundation Curatorial Seminar Aaron Levy M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2020 semester, the topic will be: Elijah Pierce's America: Barnes Foundation Curatorial Seminar This Spiegel-Wilks Curatorial Seminar is offered in collaboration with the Barnes Foundation. Students will be provided with an immersion in curatorial and museum studies and will have the opportunity to interact with curators, scholars, and staff at Penn and the museum, including Executive Director and President Thom Collins, who will co-teach the course. The course syllabus will engage the permanent collection at the museum, where the course will meet weekly. As part of the course, students will also conduct research and contribute to the temporary exhibition opening at the Barnes Foundation that semester, which will feature the work of Elijah Pierce (1892-1984), a self-taught woodcarver whose handcrafted works reacted to life in 20th-century America. One of the first generations of African Americans born into freedom, his remarkable narratives depict religious parables, autobiographical scenes, episodes from American politics, and figures from popular culture. ENGL205401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 315-401 Topics in Japanese Art: From Edo To Tokyo Julie N Davis CANCELED Topics vary from semester to semester. For the Fall 2020 semester, the topic will be: From Edo to Tokyo. How did a fishing village with a ramshackle castle become an early modern megalopolis over the course of a century? How did that city modernize rapidly, rebuild, and rebuild again to become one of the most technologically advanced urban environments in the world? In this course we will study the development of the city of Edo and its transformation into Tokyo through its urban planning, architecture, and visual arts. Starting with the formation of the shogun's city, Edo, we'll look at castles, mausolea, paintings, and other works to track the uses of architecture and art in the service of political power. At the same time, the long-time imperial capital of Kyoto (Miyako) and other regions actively expanded artistic modes, making this one of the most dynamic eras in Japanese art history, and a new urban population supported other forms of architecture and visual arts, including gardens, paintings, ceramics, and prints. In the final weeks of the course, we will consider how Edo became Tokyo, and how the city was rebuilt through modernization and land reclamation as well as after the 1923 earthquake and the Allied firebombing of WWII. And how did the postwar boom once more transform Tokyo, while also retaining traces and spaces of this earlier part of the city? Finally, we'll think about the ways in which the Olympics in 1964 and 2020 put the city EALC154401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Instructor</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Global Seminar</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 320-301 Aegean Bronze Age Art: Luxury Items Elizabeth Shank W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM Topics vary from semester to semester. For the Fall 2020 semester, the topic will be "Luxury Items." Artifacts from the Aegean Bronze Age (3,000-1,100 BCE) such as gold jewelry and vessels, carved stone vases and seals of exotic materials as well as fine pottery and carved ivory are just some of the luxury items recovered from archaeological sites in Greece that clearly demonstrate the cosmopolitan nature of this society. In this class we will examine these luxury items and discuss how these masterpieces were made, the craftspeople who made them, what they may have meant in the context of Aegean society, and what they tell us about trade in this early period with Egypt and the Ancient Near East. From the Shaft Grave items recovered by Heinrich Schliemann at Mycenae to the artifacts from Akrotiri on the island of Thera, the so-called 'Pompeii of the Aegean,' it is obvious that luxury was a concept familiar to the prehistoric Greek people. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 324-401 Dress & Fashion in Afrca Ali B. Ali-Dinar TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Throughout Africa, social and cultural identities of ethnicity, gender, generation, rank and status were conveyed in a range of personal ornamentation that reflects the variation of African cultures. The meaning of one particular item of clothing can transform completely when moved across time and space. As one of many forms of expressive culture, dress shape and give forms to social bodies. In the study of dress and fashion, we could note two distinct broad approaches, the historical and the anthropological. While the former focuses on fashion as a western system that shifted across time and space, and linked with capitalism and western modernity; the latter approach defines dress as an assemblage of modification the body. The Africanist proponents of this anthropological approach insisted that fashion is not a dress system specific to the west and not tied with the rise of capitalism. This course will focus on studying the history of African dress by discussing the forces that have impacted and influenced it overtime, such as socio-economic, colonialism, religion, aesthetics, politics, globalization, and popular culture. The course will also discuss the significance of the different contexts that impacted the choices of what constitute an appropriate attire for distinct situations. African dress in this context is not a fixed relic from the past, but a live cultural item that s influenced by the surrounding forces. AFRC324401, ANTH342401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 329-401 Topics in Roman Art/Arch: Last Days of Pompeii Mantha Zarmakoupi W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2020 semester, the topic will be "The Last Days of Pompeii." Pompeii is one of the most famous archaeological sites in the world. Not fully excavated and only partially understood, it seems to offer a tantalizing cross-section of Roman architecture, art and society, preserved as it was when the volcano Mount Vesuvius erupted on 24 August 79 CE. At the same time, the rediscovery of Pompeii since the eighteenth century has had a profound impact on western culture. This course will look at the discovery, reception and reinvention as well as "original" character of Pompeii and other settlements around Vesuvius destroyed at the same time as Pompeii, such as Herculaneum and Stabiae. We will examine the evidence that these Campanian sites provide for Roman architecture, art and society, and the difficulties we face in trying to use it. The course will include a range of material, from the architecture of houses and public areas of the city, tackling the notions of public and private in Roman society, the wall painting in Pompeian houses, examining the forms and functions of Roman frescoes as well as the ways in which they have been viewed in antiquity and modern times, to the shops, workshops and taverns that populated the ancient city and provide evidence for its economy. The approach is thematic, addressing the urban planning and development of the city, the domestic spaces and activities, the public spaces and buildings, and economy of the city, concentrating on case studies, such as the Forum, the House of the Vettii, the textile industry and the Villa of the Papyri. No special prior knowledge of antiquity is assumed. CLST325401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 383-401 Queer Modernisms Jonathan D Katz TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course tracks the development of Modernism in America, Western Europe, and specific other locations around the globe, with particular emphasis as to how and why dissident sexualities so often found expression in and as aesthetic dissent. Creating new expressive forms and theories that often seem far removed from any traditional definition of sexuality, queer modernist artists often replaced dangerous forms of social dissent with more prudent forms of formal dissidence. In pursuing these questions, we will place art in its broader social context, seeking to answer such significant problems as how and why forms of artistic representation that were once transparent, eminently legible to all strata of society, increasingly became, under the avant garde, designed to speak only to an elect, to a select few in our culture. We will ask what happens when art deliberately narrows its audience, and how that narrowing is related to questions of sexual difference. What is the relationship between queerness and cultural elitism, a connection generally presumed in popular culture, but rarely examined academically? And finally we will ask about the utility of forms of queer political dissent if those forms remain illegible as queer to a wider audience. Throughout, new methods informed by queer, gender, and critical race theory will be utilized. GSWS315401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 387-401 The History of Children's Television Linda R. Simensky M 04:30 PM-07:30 PM This topic course explores multiple and different aspects of Animation. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings. Fall 2018: This course will look at American animation as an art form, an industry and a variety of technologies and approaches. We will explore the ways in which artistic, technical, historical, and cultural conditions shape the development of animation and in turn, how animation impacts viewers. Topics will include trends in animation and their relation to contemporary popular culture, issues of art versus commerce in the creation of cartoons, the intersection of animation and politics, and shifts in style and technique throughout the years. We will look at the figures in animation who have shaped the art form and continue to influence it, the rise in animation's popularity, and current-day applications of animated imagery. Case studies will include Pixar, Walt Disney, UPA, television cartoons, stop motion animation, and the movie, Who Framed Roger Rabbit. ENGL302401, FNAR320401, CIMS320401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 391-401 Topics Film History: American Independents Meta Mazaj TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings. ENGL291401, CIMS201401, COML201401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 501-301 Curatorial Seminar: Tress Collection: Japanese Illustrated Books Julie N Davis CANCELED Curatorial seminars expose students to the complexity of studying and working with objects in the context of public display. With the guidance of faculty and museum professionals, students learn what it means to curate an exhibition, create catalogues and gallery text, and/or develop programming for exhibitions of art and visual/material culture. Students in this curatorial seminar will participate in planning the exhibition of Japanese illustrated books from the Tress collection to be held in the Kislak Center in spring 2021. Japanese illustrated books are celebrated for their high technical and aesthetic achievements and the collection spans all genres and formats over more than three hundred years. In this course, students will be thinking through how we can tell the story of the illustrated book in Japan in the space of the exhibition. We will think through how these materials related to their broad and largely literate audiences, and we'll pay close attention to artists, genres, technologies, and subjects. Students will conduct research, prepare didactic labels, write entries for the catalogue, and develop the website and symposium as part of their curatorial practice. There will be extensive hands-on engagement with examples from the Kislak collections as well as practical training in papermaking, materials, and binding. By permission only. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Instructor</span>
ARTH 505-640 Mla Seminar: Michelangelo: Painter, Sculptor, Architecte Christopher Pastore W 05:00 PM-07:40 PM This MLA course in the history of art explores an aspect of Art History and Theory, specific course topics vary. Please see the College of Liberal and Professional Studies Course Guide for a description of current offerings. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Undergraduates Need Permission</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 523-401 Narrative in Ancient Art Holly Pittman
Ann L Kuttner
T 04:30 PM-07:30 PM Art history, and its cousins in religious, social, political and literary studies, have long been fascinated with the question of narrative: how do images engage time, tell stories? These are fundamental questions for ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian and Mediterranean art history and archaeology, whose rich corpus of narrative images is rarely considered in the context of "Western" art. Relations between words and things, texts and images, were as fundamental to the ancient cultures we examine as they are to modern studies. As we weigh classic modern descriptions of narrative and narratology, we will bring to bear recent debates about how (ancient) images, things, monuments, and designed spaces engage with time, space, and event, and interact with cultural memory. We will ask "who is the story for, and why?" for public and private narratives ranging from political histories to mythological encounters. Our case studies will be drawn from the instructors' expertise in Mesopotamian visual culture, and in the visual cultures of the larger Mediterranean world from early Greek antiquity to the Hellenistic, Roman, and Late Antique periods. One central and comparative question, for instance, is the nature of recording history in pictures and texts in the imperial projects of Assyria, Achaemenid Persia, the Hellenistic kingdoms, and Rome. AAMW523401, CLST523401, NELC523401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 532-401 Topics in Byzantine Art: the Icon Ivan Drpic R 03:00 PM-06:00 PM Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2020 semester, the topic will be: The Icon. This seminar explores the Byzantine icon and its legacy. Spanning nearly two millennia, from the emergence of Christian sacred portraiture to the reception of icon painting by the early twentieth-century Russian avant-garde, the seminar will introduce you to the history, historiography, and theories of the icon. While our focus will be on Byzantium and the wider world of Orthodox Christianity, especially in the Slavic Balkans and Eastern Europe, the seminar will also engage with fundamental questions concerning the nature, status, and agency of images across cultures. Topics to be addressed include iconoclasm and the problem of idolatry; the social and ritual lives of icons; authorship, originality, and replication; viewer response and the cultural construction of vision; the frontier between art and the sacred image; and the afterlife of the icon in modernity. AAMW530401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 540-401 Topics in Medieval Art: Migrating Materiality: Ivory Carving Around the Mediterranean Sarah M. Guerin M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2020 semester, the topic will be Migrating Materiality: Ivory Carving Around the Mediterranean. The craft of ivory carving around the Mediterranean is contingent upon the availability of imported elephant tusks, from either South East Asia or, more frequently, from the African continent. The shifting winds of trade routes offer an interpretive paradigm with which to analyze ivory objects from a variety of different cultural groups: the lack or abundance of ivory and the resulting desire for or surfeit of the material shapes its meaning and use around the Mediterranean basin. The study of ivory objects as they migrate around the Mediterranean allows us to investigate the rich intercultural interactions between Eastern and Western Christians, and both of these with the Islamic world. This course focuses on an object-oriented knowledge of ivory artifacts, with a strong emphasis on the collections at the Penn Museum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and other area collections. AAMW540401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 561-401 Privacy and Society: Dutch Painting in the 17th Century Shira N. Brisman W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2020 semester, the topic will be: Privacy and Society: Dutch Painting in the Seventeenth Century. How do paintings offer occasions for personal reflection, and how do they construct social bonds? This course will promote new critical approaches to interrogate three areas of Dutch "Golden Age" painting: the development of landscape tradition; the pictorialization of interior domestic spaces; the concept of group portraiture. The burgeoning art market of the seventeenth offered both new forms of intimacy--inviting the beholder into domestic interiors to observe the events of everyday life--and public statements about leadership, social structures, and national identity. Freed from the patronage of churches and courts, Dutch artists produced pictures that could be purchased for the home--landscapes, moralizing genre scenes, still lifes, and portraits. They also made paintings for public spaces such as guild halls and charitable organizations, which map the relationships between members of civic organizations. The aim of this course is to develop a set of critical skills for analyzing the different ways in which seventeenth-century Dutch paintings drew upon shared social values, national identity and economic pride, how they appealed to individual buyer tastes, and how they established ideologies of land rights and concepts of gendered space that may today be critiqued as exclusionary. We will use our current circumstance of "social distancing" as a way to look anew at the question of how paintings of this period used art to construct social bonds. Online in format, this course will address these matters by pairing recent interventions in art history with foundational texts. Part of our ongoing collective work will be the construction of a checklist of paintings, drawings, and prints in the Philadelphia area and its environs in the hopes that we may eventually view these works together or have a shared plan of which works to observe in person as time and access permits. In writing assignments, we will attend to the representation of space, considering domestic interiors, urban settings, church architecture, imperial arenas, and the politicization of landscapes both real and imagined. GRMN578401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 571-401 Urbanism David B Brownlee
Zhongjie Lin
R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM A survey of architectural theory from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. The discussion of original writings will be emphasized. CPLN572401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Undergraduates Need Permission</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 580-401 Sex & Postmodern Art Jonathan D Katz CANCELED GSWS578401
ARTH 583-401 Art Sex and the Sixties Jonathan D Katz R 04:30 PM-07:30 PM With a distinct emphasis on post World War II performance, film, sculpture and painting, this course explores the conjunction of the period's systematic revamping of our social/sexual schema with the equally revolutionary ascendancy of an artistic postmodernity. And it seeks to explore this dynamic not only within the familiar confines of North America and Europe but towards Latin America and Asia, too, in what was a nearly simultaneous emergence of the erotic as a political force in the 60s. Reading a range of key voices from Brazilian theorist and poet Oswald de Andrade to Frankfurt School philosopher Herbert Marcuse, performance artists Carolee Schneemann, and Yoko Ono, Neo-Freudian theorist Norman O. Brown and lesbian feminist author Monique Wittig, we will examine how and why sex became a privileged form of politics at this historical juncture in a range of different contexts across the globe. Students interested in feminist, gender or queer theory, social revolution, performance studies, post war art and Frankfurt School thought should find the course particularly appealing, but it assumes no background in any of these fields. GSWS520401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 624-401 Art of Mesopotamia Holly Pittman TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The class presents a survey of the art and archaeology of Mesopotamia beginning with the appearance of the first cities and ending with the fall of the Assyrian Empire in the seventh century BCE. It presents the major artistic monuments of Mesopotamian culture, embedding them in their historical context. Focus is placed in particular on the interactions with surrounding cultures of Iran, Central Asia, the Caucasus, the Persian Gulf and Anatolia in order to decenter the discourse from a strictly Mesopotamian perspective. The format is lecture; assignments involve reading response papers; there are in class midterm and final exams. ARTH224401, AAMW624401, NELC224401, NELC624401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 650-401 Michelangelo and the Art of the Italian Renaissance David Young Kim MWF 10:00 AM-11:00 AM An introduction to the work of the Renaissance artist Michelangelo (1475-1564)-his sculptures, paintings, architecture, poetry, and artistic theory-in relation to his patrons, predecessors, and contemporaries, above all Leonardo and Raphael. Topics include artistic creativity and license, religious devotion, the revival of antiquity, observation of nature, art as problem-solving, the public reception and function of artworks, debates about style, artistic rivalry, and traveling artists. Rather than taking the form of a survey, this course selects works as paradigmatic case studies, and will analyze contemporary attitudes toward art of this period through study of primary sources. ARTH250401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 673-401 History of Photography Gregory M. Vershbow TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM A history of photography and theories of photography from 1839 to the present. Photography's origins are rooted both in artistic desire and technological ingenuity. Some of photography's inventors identified more as artists than engineers. At many points in the history of the medium, the question remains open whether new forms of artistic expression are driven by new technologies, or whether new technologies emerge to fulfill the desires of artistic imagination. This class will address photography's relationship with painting, print, and drawing. It will examine the effect of photography on portraiture, landscape, depictions of motion, and abstraction. We will also investigate the changing cultural perception of photography as an artistic medium from the 19th to the 21st century. ARTH273401
ARTH 674-601 Facing America William D Schmenner W 05:30 PM-08:30 PM This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examining the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino, and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, including museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s. ASAM294601, AFRC294601, ARTH274601, LALS274601, CIMS293601 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Undergraduates Need Permission</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 678-401 American Art Michael Leja TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course surveys the most important and interesting art produced in the United States (or by American artists living abroad) up through the 1950s. This period encompasses the history of both early and modern art in the U.S., from its first appearances to its rise to prominence and institutionalization. While tracking this history, the course examines art's relation to historical processes of modernization (industrialization, the development of transportation and communications, the spread of corporate organization in business, urbanization, technological development, the rise of mass media and mass markets, etc.) and to the economic polarization, social fragmentation, political conflict, and the cultural changes these developments entailed. In these circumstances, art is drawn simultaneously toward truth and fraud, realism and artifice, science and spirituality, commodification and ephemerality, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, individualism and collectivity, the past and the future, professionalization and popularity, celebrating modern life and criticizing it. ARTH278401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 681-401 Modern Arch:1900-Present David B Brownlee MWF 11:00 AM-12:00 PM The architecture of Europe and America from the late nineteenth century until the present is the central subject of this course, but some time is also devoted to Latin American and Asian architecture and to the important issues of modern city planning. Topics discussed include the Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau, Expressionism, Art Deco, the International Style, and Post-modernism. The debate over the role of technology in modern life and art, the search for a universal language of architectural communication, and the insistent demand that architecture serve human society are themes that are traced throughout the course. Among the important figures to be considered are Frank Lloyd Wright, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, Robert Venturi, and Denise Scott Brown. The course includes weekly discussion sessions and several excursions to view architecture in Philadelphia. ARTH281401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 750-401 Topics in S. Ren Art: Figure and Ground David Young Kim W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2020 semester, the topic will be "Figure and Ground." We owe the Renaissance picture more than the idealized human figure. For figure, depends on ground, here defined in at least three senses: 1) the ground as the material preparation of the support; 2) the plane where figures anchor their place in the pictorial world; and 3) the field in and against which figuration occurs, namely the background. In this graduate seminar, we will attempt to discuss, debate, and formulate ideas and methods to interpret the Renaissance picture according to these three semantic areas of ground. We will begin with gold grounds in the fourteenth century and conclude with the darkened grounds of tenebrist painters such as Caravaggio. In addition to reading current art historical scholarship grappling with several "turns" (material, global, ecocritical) as well as Anne Cheng's notion of "ornamentalism" that draws from critical race and gender theory, we will also focus our attention on those Renaissance writers who described and prescribed the look of the picture in ways not usually accommodated by standard art historical approaches. Rather than recuperating the ground as an integral category, we will instead consider the acute dilemma of the ground's theoretical exception. ITAL641401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span>
ARTH 777-401 The Long 19th Century Liliane Weissberg T 03:00 PM-06:00 PM The present course will discuss German literature and thought from the period of the French Revolution to the turn of the twentieth century, and put it into a European context. In regard to German literature, this is the period that leads from the Storm and Stress and Romanticism to the political period of the Vormarz, Realism, and finally Expressionism; in philosophy, it moves from German Idealism to the philosophy of Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and neo-Kantian thought. It is also the period that saw the rise of the novel, and new forms of dramatic works. Painting moved out of the studio into plein air; the invention of photography made an imprint on all arts, and the rise of the newspaper led to new literary genres such as the feuilleton. Economically, Germany experienced the industrial revolution; politically, it was striving for a unification that was finally achieved in 1871. The nineteenth century saw the establishment of the bourgeoisie, the emergence of the German working class, and the idea of the nation state; it also saw Jewish emancipation, and the call for women's rights. Readings will focus on a variety of literary, political, and philosophical texts; and consider a selection of art works. GRMN558401, COML566401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Undergraduates Need Permission</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do
ARTH 792-401 Reading Against Racism Karen E Redrobe F 09:00 AM-11:00 AM This course takes as its starting point Audre Lorde's 1981 Keynote presentation at the National Women's Studies Association Conference, "The Uses of Anger: Women Responding to Racism." Lorde, critiquing white feminists, states, "I cannot hide my anger to spare you guilt, nor hurt feelings, nor answering anger; for to do so insults and trivializes all our efforts. Guilt is not a response to anger; it is a response to one's own actions or lack of action. If it leads to change then it can be useful, since it is then no longer guilt but the beginning of knowledge. Yet all too often, guilt is just another name for impotence, for defensiveness destructive of communication; it becomes a device to protect ignorance and the continuation of things the way they are, the ultimate protection for changelessness." Eschewing defensiveness, ignorance, and innocence, and opening to meaningful change by engaging the writings of anti-racist and anti-imperialist thinkers, including those focused on the transformation of higher education, this course examines the responsibilities scholars take on when we affirm that "Black Lives Matter," and acknowledges that higher education, including the humanities, is actively implicated in the structures and operations of white privilege and anti-black racism as well as in other intersectional modes of exclusion, including all forms of discrimination based on race, ethnicity, national original, ability, class, sexuality, gender, and beliefs. The course aims to approach these urgent but longstanding issues in ways that help us to understand some of the complexities, practicalities, and temporalities of the work of change; to grapple with what Rosalyn Deutsche in Hiroshima After Iraq (2011) describes as "the inseparability of the social and the psychic"; and to seek out effective alternatives to the tendency of politicized academic writing in time of conflict to regress to what Deutsche calls "heroic masculinism." "Reading Against Racism" is imagined as a way of catalyzing active, collective, and long-term anti-racist, anti-imperialist intellectual work. It seeks to participate in the development of more just and inclusive academic modes and spaces by fostering time and structure for thought and self-reflection, by generating ideas for implementation, and by learning from our readings as well as from each other. CIMS792401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">For PhD Students Only</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do